Israel will be "extinct" if it keeps acting like a "dinosaur"

Israel will be

The outgoing chief of the Israeli army’s home front command warned Wednesday that Israel would be "extinct" if it continued to act like a "dinosaur" in its conflict with regional enemies.

The outgoing chief of the Israeli army’s home front command warned Wednesday that Israel would be "extinct" if it continued to act like a "dinosaur" in its conflict with regional enemies.

In an interview with The Times of Israel published on Thursday, Eyal Eisenberg said an agreement at the close of the nuclear negotiations in Switzerland would require a “very serious situational assessment” and a corresponding decision about “where Israel is headed, for better and for worse.”

Eisenberg, who concluded on Tuesday a four-year term as the commander of the home front, refused to say specifically if Israel’s central concern would be a greater freedom of action for pro-Iranian, non-state actors such as Hezbollah or threats more directly associated with Iran’s burgeoning nuclear program, but he added that Israel would be forced to draw conclusions.

"You can’t act like an ostrich and bury your head in the sand and say nothing has changed,” he said. “Something has changed. A very, very basic element in your situational assessment is changing. You have to relate to it.”

Eisenberg, who commanded the Gaza Division during Operation Cast Lead in 2008-9 spoke candidly about the changing threat from Gaza and the expected shape of a future war with Hezbollah.

Likening Israel to a dinosaur and, later, to Gulliver, he said that “across the entire history of mankind,” all massive changes have resulted in “the extinction” of the larger, ostensibly stronger creatures and the survival of the more adaptable smaller species.

For example, in Operation Cast Lead, he said, the army saw “the buds of” Hamas’ tunnel warfare doctrine but failed to act with sufficient alacrity. “To what extent were we able to take those buds and start a learning process? It did not surprise us…And that is what is concerning.

The downside of the air defense system, which has successfully destroyed over 85 percent of targeted projectiles during the past two campaigns, he said, is that while organizations like Hamas and Hezbollah once took pride in the ability to fight Israel for weeks on end, that very sense of pride was in fact turned into a central part of their fighting doctrine.

He added that the public should prepare for “between 1,200 and 1,500″ rockets per day during an early stage of a war with Hezbollah.



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