ISIS destroys archaeological symbol in Mosul dates to the 7th century BC

Militant fighters of the ISIS have reportedly destroyed another archaeological icon in the Iraqi city of Mosul, using military equipment, local sources reported on Tuesday.

Militant fighters of the ISIS have reportedly destroyed another archaeological icon in the Iraqi city of Mosul, using military equipment, local sources reported on Tuesday.

Local activists confirmed that ISIS demolished the Gate of God [Eia] which dates back to the 7th century BC, the time of the Assyrian king Sennacherib.

The media activist Zuheir Mousilly said that since its control over the city of Mosul in 2014, ISIS have destroyed much of Iraqi historic sites and monuments, including the Assyrian city of Nimrud, the Winged Bulls, and the Mosul National Museum, after stealing the removable pieces for smuggling.

The expert on the Iraqi Antiquities Affairs Yasser Hatami condemned the destruction of the historic gate “Mishqi”.

The historic Mishqi gate, which was discovered in 1968, is considered one of the ancient gates in eastern Nineveh province.

“ISIS views tombs they destroy as sacrilegious and a return to paganism,” Syrian antiquities chief Abdul Maamoun Abdulkarim said in an earlier report.

Last year, ISIS extremists bombed the renowned Yezidi ancient minaret of the Shingal district (120 km west of the city of Mosul), in northern Iraq.

In April, 2015, the terror group blew up the church of Virgin Mary in the Assyrian village of Tel Nasri near the town of Tel Temir (50 km west of Hasakah) in northeastern Syria.

Also, the radical group blew up two monuments in the ancient city of Palmyra in central Syria in June, 2015, according to local sources.


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